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Probate Research

Probate Research

Probate is a set of court or government procedures established for the orderly transfer of property from a deceased person to his or her heirs and/or assigns. Records kept in the course of a probate action are valuable sources for information for genealogists about the deceased and the deceased’s family. One of the greatest challenges in using probate and other legal documents is understanding the terminology. The simple solution is to use the Internet or a … Read entire article »

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Using the FamilySearch Catalog

Using the FamilySearch Catalog

The FamilySearch Catalog, previously known as the Family History Library Catalog, has additional functionality that you need to be aware of! The FamilySearch Catalog name changed when FamilySearch began to include catalog items from FamilySearch’s Family History Library (FHL)*, Family History Centers and FamilySearch Libraries around the world. One of the most exciting new developments for the FamilySearch Catalog is that in … Read entire article »

Prove the Marriage at our Family History Retreat in February

Prove the Marriage at our Family History Retreat in February

Understanding the first record of the family—beginning of the family unit is critical to your research success. Marriage records often reveal identification of Groom, the maiden name of the Bride, and other significant people in the lives of the Groom and Bride. Did you know that a minimum of 16 different official, legal marriage records could be found to document your … Read entire article »

Searching for Immigrant Ancestors

Searching for Immigrant Ancestors

By James L. Tanner Nearly everyone who pursues his or her genealogical research for some time will encounter the problem of identifying an immigrant ancestor. The natural tendency is for the researcher to begin trying to find the immigrant ancestor in the country of origin. However, researchers will have much more success by beginning their research in the country of arrival. … Read entire article »

DearMYRTLE and Holly Hansen: Scandinavian Research Retreat

DearMYRTLE and Holly Hansen: Scandinavian Research Retreat

DearMYRTLE loves family history research and loves sharing innovative ways to increase research success. On December 22nd she interviewed Holly about the upcoming Scandinavian Research Retreat to be held in Salt Lake City. DearMYRTLE, Russ Worthington, and Holly discuss the benefits of attending a Family History Expos Research Retreat in Salt Lake City. Watch the interview online: We look … Read entire article »

LifeStory and Family History Expos Have Teamed Up!

LifeStory and Family History Expos Have Teamed Up!

We have worked with LifeStory for many years. They are exhibitors at many of our Expos and Retreats. We love their Heritage Collector System. If you do not already own “The Heritage Collector System” today is the day to download and try the Free Standard Version. Marlo and Holly have been working together for years with webinars, classes, and training that … Read entire article »

Ask -the-Pros — Question and Answer — Patronymic or Matronymic

Question: What is a patronymic or matronymic? Answer: A patronym, or patronymic, is a name that is based on the name of the father, grandfather, or any important male in the family. Example: In Scandinavia the surname “Hansen” mean “Hans’ son” and “Carlson” means “Carl’s son”. patronymic → “pater” (“father) + “nym” (“name”) A matronym, or matronymic is part of a personal name based on the mother’s name or any other important female in the family.  In Iceland the name “Mínervudóttir” means “Minerva’s daughter”. You often see matronyms used in Spanish names. matronymic → “mater” (“mother”) + “nym” (“name”) … Read entire article »

Assessing Scandinavian Information in FamilySearch’s Family Tree

In the Scandinavian or Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, (also Northern Germany and the Netherlands before 1811) the patronymic naming system was used. That means, a Scandinavian’s surname was formed by taking the first name of their natural father, and adding “–sen –sson or -datter –dotter” to it. It was a very good and necessary system for the time period it was in use. It also means, however, that you could find several people living in the same record keeping jurisdiction at the same time, with the same surnames, who are totally unrelated to each other. Proving which “Lars Larsen” is YOUR ancestor is the task. The age of computers, and ever increasing capability … Read entire article »

Ask -the-Pros — Question and Answer — Why is the Family History Library Important?

Question: Why is the Family History Library important when there is so much available online? Answer: All the collections housed in the Family History Library (FHL) are not online. This is the largest collection in the world. You can easily research records in multiple counties or countries in one day just by moving from one floor to another. Many of the records that have been microfilmed over the past 100 years are only available in Salt Lake City at the FHL. Some of the older records in churches and government repositories are made available through the FHL when the originals are too fragile to touch in person. Many state archives in the US have large collections available through the FHL. … Read entire article »

Research and Resources at the Family History Library

The Family History Library (FHL)* houses a collection of genealogical records that includes the names of more than 3 billion deceased people. FamilySearch continues to collect digital images from many countries that are deposited and made available through the Family History Library. Records collected include birth, marriage, and death registers from both churches and governments. Other records types that are high priority for the collection include census returns, court records, land and property records, probate records; emigration and immigration lists; printed genealogies; and family histories. Some of the records housed in Salt Lake City are available for rental through one of the more than 4,600 family history centers located in 132 countries. Patrons may also access FamilySearch … Read entire article »

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