Family History Expos Genealogy Blog » Family History Education

New England Ancestors

Before you begin searching the records for your New England Ancestors, spend some time learning about the jurisdictional breakdown of the state where your ancestors say they originated. Each New England State is different. These differences affect what records are available and where you find them. A good place to start is with Val Greenwood’s, The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 3rd edition 2000. Each basic source is compared state by state. Study the localities including place names both present and past (some are extinct). Make note of the physical setting, is it urban or rural. What are the nearby features? Mountains, rivers, lakes, roads, coastlines and specific residences, these will be important to your research. Changes in localities affect what records have been preserved and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Tracing a Southern Pedigree

Tracing a Southern pedigree is one of the most difficult genealogy challenges you will experience—consider:  you have been looking for your ancestors for 20-25 years. And you are still looking.  Every time you come to the FamilySearch Library, you bring the same research tasks you brought with you last time. You are looking for the same ancestor. There are billions of ancestors now online at Ancestry.com. At MyHeritage.com. At FindMyPast.com. And at FamilySearch.org.  Billions!  From all over the world, to be sure.  But, most of the names come from American records and sources.  If this be true—why is it so hard to find your American ancestor?  Your German ancestor? Your Swedish Ancestor? And to know, for sure, that these ancestors belong to you? Family History Expos is presenting a series of monthly … Read entire article »

Filed under: Boots and Compass Research, Family History Education

Ask-the-Pros — Non Conformist Church Records in Wales

Ask-the-Pros — Non Conformist Church Records in Wales

Question: How do I find non-conformist church records in Wales?  Answer:  Here are six points to consider: One- check The Religious Census of 1851: A Calendar of the Returns Relating to Wales, printed in 2 volumes. Available on microfiche from the Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City, Utah, #6054483. You can order it into any local Family History Center near you. Think about this, the chapel may have been built in 1825, with a congregation that began in 1750. … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

Expand your research using clues right in front of you! Here are 10 tips to get you started: Use cemetery inscriptions to fill in vital record gaps for missing census years. Discover original spelling of your surname on immigrant tombstones. Even if the surname changed upon arrival the family wanted it spelled right on Grandfather’s tombstone. Identify places of origin: look for place names written on the tombstone. Notice when they are buried in an ethnic section of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

Exciting New Breakthrough on Scottish Ancestors

Exciting New Breakthrough on Scottish Ancestors

After 55 years an ad in the Ayrshire Post gets answered. My personal preparation for the upcoming British Isles Retreat and Family History Library learning experience, in Salt Lake City May 18-22, 2015, has been quite exciting and I’d like to share some of it with you. My Responsibility It is my responsibility to co-ordinate the program, post it online, work with the hotels, and get the research guide ready for the classroom. I also get to participate … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Ask-the-Pros — Question and Answer — Iowa Vital Records

Question: How do I access Vital Records for Iowa and what is available? Answer: Iowa State administrative processing of vital records consist of but are not limited to: adoptions, amendments, births, deaths, legal name changes, marriages, delayed certificate, foreign-born birth, and court-ordered actions. A copy or extract of most original records can be purchased from the Iowa Vital Records State Department of Health or the County Clerk’s office of the county where the event occurred. Effective as of January 1, 2014 vital records fee transactions from the State is $20. Statewide registration for births and deaths began in 1880 and general compliance was by 1924. Marriages began to be recorded with formation of the county. Statewide registration began in 1880 with compliance also in 1880. Some vital records for Iowa are available through FamilySearch Historical Records at no cost, they … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

Bounty Land Records

Bounty Land Records

Bounty land records identify the earliest date of residence or arrival for ancestors. Bounty land records frequently supply other places of residence for them which leads you to additional places to search for them. These sources identify ancestors both military and non-military. Here are a few facts about bounty lands: Military bounty land was awarded in specific tracts or areas where boundaries were set by law The military man was required to describe his military service, dates, … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Charting for Success

Charting for Success

Visual aids are critical when working on your family history projects. Charts help you to visually understand relationships and identify holes in your research. A variety of charts can be used for different purposes during various stages of research. Here are a few types of charts to use and some info on how they can assist you: Timelines – Use a time line to track an ancestor or family over time. When you first begin your … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Probate Research

Probate Research

Probate is a set of court or government procedures established for the orderly transfer of property from a deceased person to his or her heirs and/or assigns. Records kept in the course of a probate action are valuable sources for information for genealogists about the deceased and the deceased’s family. One of the greatest challenges in using probate and other legal documents is understanding the terminology. The simple solution is to use the Internet or a … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Family History Education, Newsletter

Using the FamilySearch Catalog

Using the FamilySearch Catalog

The FamilySearch Catalog, previously known as the Family History Library Catalog, has additional functionality that you need to be aware of! The FamilySearch Catalog name changed when FamilySearch began to include catalog items from FamilySearch’s Family History Library (FHL)*, Family History Centers and FamilySearch Libraries around the world. One of the most exciting new developments for the FamilySearch Catalog is that in 2014 it became available via OCLC WorldCat, the world’s largest bibliographic database for materials. WorldCat … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

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