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Ask-the-Pros — Question and Answer — Old Style Handwriting

Ask-the-Pros — Question and Answer — Old Style Handwriting

Question: How do you read old documents accurately? Can I learn to do this myself? Answer: The study of old handwriting is called paleography. There are many guides and helps available to us today. Classes taught at family history events and online. Whether you are reading a will, a census page, colonial records, even a stranger’s handwriting it takes practice. Each time I read the census I study the handwriting by looking at easy to decipher names and then … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Family History Education, Research Tips

Why Virginia Church Records Are Important

Why Virginia Church Records Are Important

By Arlene Eakle Why Church Records Are Important for Hard-to-Find Virginia Ancestors… Church records can be one of the most important sources you search for hard-to-find Virginia ancestors.  Here’s what I know about them– Church records provide births, marriages, and deaths on a fairly consistent basis.  Some churches do better in one or more vital record categories than others.  The creation of these records depends upon whether the civil government has ascribed by law that the church should the vital … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

October Family History Research Retreat

October Family History Research Retreat

Each October we hold one of our best Family History Library Research Retreats in the heart of Utah! This year is no exception and we invite you to come join with us at the world renowned Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City, Utah. You will learn how to use the FHL, Ancestry.com, MyHeritage, and FindMyPast.com along with proven research techniques that give you the best possible chance for research success. Enjoy the personal assistance … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Family History Education, Featured, Newsletter

Ask-the-Pros – Question and Answer – Correctly Identifying Place Names

Question: How can I tell if a location mentioned in family papers is a town or a county? Answer: Be careful and pay attention to details when considering the name of a location. Place names can create a load of problems for researchers. When you are working with locality be as precise as possible. If someone left information without the details needed you will want to check it out thoroughly before you make a definite decision. Using logic you can at time guess the correct location. For Example: Morgan, Utah is in Morgan County, Utah. But this is not always the case. For Example: Morgan, Georgia is in Calhoun County, Georgia. Not to be confused with Morgan County, Georgia. And they are located in totally different areas of the state. Make a note and remember … Read entire article »

Filed under: Research Tips

If Your Serious About Your Ancestry… Real Genealogy Expertise is Needed

If Your Serious About Your Ancestry… Real Genealogy Expertise is Needed

By Arlene H. Eakle, Ph.D. Become a genealogy expert and pass this expertise on to your ancestors… Creation and publication of a family tree, a genealogy, a family history is an achievement in truth–at least it should be.  Yet, in print and across the internet are some of the most appalling examples of what we call genealogy: People who live 200 years.  Children born in places that don’t exist.  Women giving birth at Biblical ages.  Documents cited … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Friends of FHExpos, Newsletter

Becoming an Expert Genealogist

Becoming an Expert Genealogist

Over the past twelve years we have met many genealogists who ask, “What does it take to become a professional genealogist?” Some say, “I wish I could just pour your brain into mine.” Everyone wants to be an expert. There is nothing wrong with that, the only problem is they want to be an expert overnight. It takes work and effort to become an expert.  In the Harvard Business Review there is an article entitled The Making … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

Compiling the Fourth Generation

Compiling the Fourth Generation

As you compile your first three generations it is likely some of the persons you are documenting may still be alive depending on your age. As you move on to the fourth generation most of them will have passed away. All of my grandparents (3rd generation) were deceased by the time I was 15 years old. In my childhood I had only one great-grandparent (4th generation) living and she was very dear to me and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

Compiling the Third Generation

Compiling the Third Generation

Compiling your first and second generations assists you in building skills and understanding the tools and document types that are helpful in building a correct family history. Using your personal family history software on your desktop is important. As have learned there are many online trees and global trees that have been shared by numerous people. Not everyone has taken the time to learn the skills and taken classes that assist in analyzing research. You are … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

Compiling the Second Generation

Compiling the Second Generation

After you have gathered and compiled your first generation you begin to recognize tools and documents that will assist you as you begin work on the second generation. At this point I recommend you have a desktop computer software application to assist you with organization. One that will interface with FamilySearch and other websites is recommended. Using a software program will assist in organization and quick retrieval of your data. I use Celebrating My Family Tree … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

Compiling the First Generation

Compiling the First Generation

Many people who become involved in family history research look at what other people have already completed on their common lines and then begin research where the first blank appears. There is a reason that Grandma or Aunt Clara stopped where they did. It was hard research! As you prepare yourself to do hard research get yourself trained to do it right from the beginning. First things first. Compile and document your 1st Generation first. Your story, … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Research Tips

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