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The Colors of our Lives

The Colors of our Lives

Written by Jennifer Hunt Johnson When you connect with your family you see how the threads of your lives are woven with those of your ancestors in a beautiful tapestry. The threads and colors from your ancestors and family blend together in a vibrant   kaleidoscope. Life is richer when we come to know the people and stories that have inspired these colors. In the weaving of your life, many have contributed to the construction of the loom and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter, Tid-bits

Genealogists and the Gordian Knot or Alexander the Great Need Not Apply

Genealogists and the Gordian Knot or Alexander the Great Need Not Apply

Written by Lorraine I. Quillon At the beginning of Alexander the Great’s career, he entered Persia at the head of his army. Here he heard of a great king who had created a huge knot of rope. A prophecy had been made that anyone who could untie that knot would become the ruler of Asia. Alexander approached, raised what must have been an extremely sharp sword, and sliced the knot in half with one stroke of the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

Cross-checking Your Data

Cross-checking Your Data

Not all historical documents are strictly accurate. Human frailties—including hearing loss, strong non-English accents, handwriting errors, and a multitude of other factors—can limit the ability genealogists have to rely upon historical records. It is also entirely possible that records were intentionally altered or recorded inaccurately due to a huge number of other possible reasons. For these reasons, names, dates, events, and every other item entered in a family file are all subject to correction by … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Celebrating Family History with Digital Illustration

Celebrating Family History with Digital Illustration

Terri Kallio submitted how she celebrates her family history through digital illustration. Her submission has earned her a complimentary registration to one of our upcoming Ask-the-Pros Friday morning research adventures. We know that “Family History Heals” and through celebrating our family history research we can share the good with others. We asked Terri how she celebrates family history and she responded: “One of my favorite ways to celebrate and share my family history is by digitally illustrating … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Friends of FHExpos, Newsletter

Court Records Yield Relationships

Court Records Yield Relationships

By Holly T. Hansen Searching through court records can be super rewarding! Most of them are not online, but many have been microfilmed and are available through the FamilySearch Family History Library. I have researched my Denham line for years. I collected the marriages, the census records (for the years available), and as many probate records as I could get my hands on. This research effort yielded much information but NOT who the father of Augustus … Read entire article »

Filed under: Boots and Compass Research, Expo News, Newsletter

Military Research in America: Pre-Revolution

Military Research in America: Pre-Revolution

Colonial Wars service is often a major gap in your genealogy knowledge.  You are far enough removed in time for traditions of military involvement to dim.  Yet, the total number of troops mustered was large enough to include some 70-85% of Southern males age 16-45, who participated in local conflicts. Your pre-revolution American ancestors lived through a whole sequence of wars, conflicts, Indian scares, and massacres between 1620 and 1774.  These events united groups of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Boots and Compass Research, Expo News, Newsletter

Locating Undertaker Records

Locating Undertaker Records

Recently I received a packet in the mail with some family history information another researcher shared with me. In return he asked if I could tell him what cities were in Weber County, Utah in 1936. He was looking for the exact death locality of an ancestor. He wanted the details. I quickly pulled up the Utah Death Certificate Index online and located the death certificate that held the answer to his question. http://www.archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/20842.htm. It also … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

New Learning Opportunities

New Learning Opportunities

Virtual Family History Expos are now available online. Check our updated schedule of events as we have made a few changes and  new offerings are being added weekly. We broadcast live from Salt Lake City and from the home office. The cost of producing onsite Expos is a real challenge. But never-the-less, we are totally committed to giving you access to high quality research guidance from the experts who know. We now offer Expert Research Guidance in the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

New England Ancestors

Before you begin searching the records for your New England Ancestors, spend some time learning about the jurisdictional breakdown of the state where your ancestors say they originated. Each New England State is different. These differences affect what records are available and where you find them. A good place to start is with Val Greenwood’s, The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 3rd edition 2000. Each basic source is compared state by state. Study the localities including place names both present and past (some are extinct). Make note of the physical setting, is it urban or rural. What are the nearby features? Mountains, rivers, lakes, roads, coastlines and specific residences, these will be important to your research. Changes in localities affect what records have been preserved and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

Expand your research using clues right in front of you! Here are 10 tips to get you started: Use cemetery inscriptions to fill in vital record gaps for missing census years. Discover original spelling of your surname on immigrant tombstones. Even if the surname changed upon arrival the family wanted it spelled right on Grandfather’s tombstone. Identify places of origin: look for place names written on the tombstone. Notice when they are buried in an ethnic section of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

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