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New Learning Opportunities

New Learning Opportunities

Virtual Family History Expos are now available online. Check our updated schedule of events as we have made a few changes and  new offerings are being added weekly. We broadcast live from Salt Lake City and from the home office. The cost of producing onsite Expos is a real challenge. But never-the-less, we are totally committed to giving you access to high quality research guidance from the experts who know. We now offer Expert Research Guidance in the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

New England Ancestors

Before you begin searching the records for your New England Ancestors, spend some time learning about the jurisdictional breakdown of the state where your ancestors say they originated. Each New England State is different. These differences affect what records are available and where you find them. A good place to start is with Val Greenwood’s, The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 3rd edition 2000. Each basic source is compared state by state. Study the localities including place names both present and past (some are extinct). Make note of the physical setting, is it urban or rural. What are the nearby features? Mountains, rivers, lakes, roads, coastlines and specific residences, these will be important to your research. Changes in localities affect what records have been preserved and … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

10 Tips for Using Cemetery Records and Inscriptions

Expand your research using clues right in front of you! Here are 10 tips to get you started: Use cemetery inscriptions to fill in vital record gaps for missing census years. Discover original spelling of your surname on immigrant tombstones. Even if the surname changed upon arrival the family wanted it spelled right on Grandfather’s tombstone. Identify places of origin: look for place names written on the tombstone. Notice when they are buried in an ethnic section of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Newsletter

Exciting New Breakthrough on Scottish Ancestors

Exciting New Breakthrough on Scottish Ancestors

After 55 years an ad in the Ayrshire Post gets answered. My personal preparation for the upcoming British Isles Retreat and Family History Library learning experience, in Salt Lake City May 18-22, 2015, has been quite exciting and I’d like to share some of it with you. My Responsibility It is my responsibility to co-ordinate the program, post it online, work with the hotels, and get the research guide ready for the classroom. I also get to participate … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Bounty Land Records

Bounty Land Records

Bounty land records identify the earliest date of residence or arrival for ancestors. Bounty land records frequently supply other places of residence for them which leads you to additional places to search for them. These sources identify ancestors both military and non-military. Here are a few facts about bounty lands: Military bounty land was awarded in specific tracts or areas where boundaries were set by law The military man was required to describe his military service, dates, … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Charting for Success

Charting for Success

Visual aids are critical when working on your family history projects. Charts help you to visually understand relationships and identify holes in your research. A variety of charts can be used for different purposes during various stages of research. Here are a few types of charts to use and some info on how they can assist you: Timelines – Use a time line to track an ancestor or family over time. When you first begin your … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Probate Research

Probate Research

Probate is a set of court or government procedures established for the orderly transfer of property from a deceased person to his or her heirs and/or assigns. Records kept in the course of a probate action are valuable sources for information for genealogists about the deceased and the deceased’s family. One of the greatest challenges in using probate and other legal documents is understanding the terminology. The simple solution is to use the Internet or a … Read entire article »

Filed under: Expo News, Family History Education, Newsletter

Using the FamilySearch Catalog

Using the FamilySearch Catalog

The FamilySearch Catalog, previously known as the Family History Library Catalog, has additional functionality that you need to be aware of! The FamilySearch Catalog name changed when FamilySearch began to include catalog items from FamilySearch’s Family History Library (FHL)*, Family History Centers and FamilySearch Libraries around the world. One of the most exciting new developments for the FamilySearch Catalog is that in 2014 it became available via OCLC WorldCat, the world’s largest bibliographic database for materials. WorldCat … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Searching for Immigrant Ancestors

Searching for Immigrant Ancestors

By James L. Tanner Nearly everyone who pursues his or her genealogical research for some time will encounter the problem of identifying an immigrant ancestor. The natural tendency is for the researcher to begin trying to find the immigrant ancestor in the country of origin. However, researchers will have much more success by beginning their research in the country of arrival. The movement of people across an international border is commonly referred to as international migration. … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

Assessing Scandinavian Information in FamilySearch’s Family Tree

In the Scandinavian or Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, (also Northern Germany and the Netherlands before 1811) the patronymic naming system was used. That means, a Scandinavian’s surname was formed by taking the first name of their natural father, and adding “–sen –sson or -datter –dotter” to it. It was a very good and necessary system for the time period it was in use. It also means, however, that you could find several people living in the same record keeping jurisdiction at the same time, with the same surnames, who are totally unrelated to each other. Proving which “Lars Larsen” is YOUR ancestor is the task. The age of computers, and ever increasing capability to combine databases has brought a new dynamic into play – Scandinavians being combined into … Read entire article »

Filed under: Family History Education, Newsletter

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